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Tax Resource Center

  • Tax Forms Explained

    Depending on the kind of account you have, you’ll be receiving different types of tax forms from Thrivent Mutual Funds. We’ve provided a detailed list of these forms to help you understand what to expect when tax time comes.


Related Articles

  • All About Required Minimum Distributions

    January 4, 2016

    Some mutual fund retirement accounts have limits to the amount of time you can keep funds before you have to start withdrawals. These Required Minimum Distributions or (RMD) are important to pay attention to for future planning.

  • Avoiding Tax Penalties on IRAs

    January 4, 2016

    An inevitable part of mutual fund investing for retirement is the need to make decisions that will impact your taxes, both now and in the future. You also need to be aware of potential tax penalties so you can plan accordingly and avoid them, if possible.

  • Corporate Actions Impacting Cost Basis

    January 4, 2016

    Thrivent Mutual Funds provides IRS Form 8937 access for corporate actions impacting the cost basis calculations for its shareholders.

  • Cost Basis

    January 4, 2016

    Cost basis is a simple idea that becomes more complex when you’ve been investing over a period of time and buying shares through reinvesting your dividends and capital gains and/or making new purchases through one-time and recurring investments.

  • IRA and ESA Contribution and Deduction Limits

    January 4, 2016

    Tax-deferred accounts have limits on the amount of money that can be contributed per year based on how you file your taxes, your income, and work status. Here’s some information about the tax ramifications of how you fund your accounts.