How to buy mutual funds & ETFs from Thrivent

We’re delighted you’re considering our funds. No matter how you buy, we’re here to help you invest with confidence.

Buy mutual funds online through Thrivent Funds

To buy mutual funds you can open an account and purchase funds right on our site.

Why buy online?

  • Set up an account starting with as little as $50 per month1
  • Access your online account at your convenience.
  • Purchase funds without transaction fees or sales charges.

 

Buy funds through your financial professional

Need more guidance? Interested in an ETF? Ask your financial professional about Thrivent Mutual Funds and ETFs.

Why work with a financial professional?

  • Receive investment help from an experienced professional.
  • Build a relationship through in-person meetings.
  • Get help planning for life’s goals such as saving and retirement.

Additional fees may apply, when working with a financial professional.

 

Buy through your brokerage account

Our mutual funds & ETFs can be purchased through online brokerage platforms. Search for Thrivent Mutual Funds and ETFs when making your selections.

Why buy through a brokerage account?

  • Add Thrivent Mutual Funds and ETFs to your investments within your existing portfolio.
  • Take advantage of your account to keep your investments in one place.

Additional fees may apply.

 


Not quite ready?

We want you to invest your money wisely and with confidence. Here are some other options that may help you.

  • Determine your personal investment style by taking our quiz.
  • Talk to your financial advisor about ETFs.
  • Sign up for our monthly investing insights newsletter.

 

Need more help?
  • For mutual funds help, call us at 800-847-4836, or email contactus@thriventfunds.com.
  • For ETFs, contact your financial professional or brokerage firm.
  • For additional help visit our support page.

 

New accounts with a minimum investment amount of $50 are offered through the Thrivent Mutual Funds "automatic purchase plan." Otherwise, the minimum initial investment requirement is $2,000 for non-retirement accounts and $1,000 for IRA or tax-deferred accounts, minimum subsequent investment requirement is $50 for all account types. Account minimums for other options vary.

Thrivent ETFs may be purchased through your financial professional or brokerage platforms.

Contact your financial professional or brokerage firm to understand minimum investment amounts when purchasing a Thrivent ETF.

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TAX RESOURCE CENTER

Taking required minimum distributions

With your retirement accounts, you will want to make sure you understand the required amount to withdraw from your account as well as the date your withdrawal must be completed by every year to avoid a 50% penalty from the IRS. In the year of your first Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) (generally, the year you turn 72), you have until April 1 of the following year to withdraw it. After the first year you reach age 72, and for every year after, you must take your RMD by December 31. However, if you turned 70½ in 2019 or prior, you must continue to take your RMD as scheduled.

The IRS has online resources that can help. IRS Publication 590-B covers IRA distributions including the RMD. Visit IRS.gov.


Affected accounts

Traditional IRA, SEP IRA, SIMPLE IRA, & all employer retirement plans


When they start
  • Traditional IRA, SEP IRA and SIMPLE IRA; you have until April 1 of the following calendar year in which you reach age 72
  • Employer retirement plans: you have until April 1 of the following calendar year in which you reach age 72 or retire, whichever comes later (if the plan document contains a delayed retirement provision)1

Exceptions

Roth IRA withdrawals are not required until after the death of the account owner.


How it’s calculated
  • RMD is calculated by dividing the account value (adjusted for any outstanding transfers, rollovers and recharacterizations) by a life expectancy factor. For most people, the Uniform Life Expectancy Table is used to determine this factor. The factor is based on a hypothetical joint life expectancy using the account owner's age and a beneficiary age 10 years younger. If the sole beneficiary is a spouse who is more than 10 years younger, then a joint life expectancy factor can be used.
  • If you have multiple traditional IRAs, the RMD must be calculated for each one, but the distribution can be taken from any one or more of the IRAs.

Options & strategies
  • Establish a balance between how long you need your money to last and the minimum you are required to withdraw every year. The IRS provides worksheets and lifetime tables that help you to accurately calculate your RMD. You can also set up a recurring distribution plan on your account with Thrivent Mutual Funds that will automatically calculate and distribute your RMD for that account each year.
  • If you are 70½ or older, you can make a qualified charitable donation (QCD) up to $100,000 which counts toward meeting the RMD requirement for an IRA. The distribution must be paid from the IRA directly to a charity. The distribution is not taxable, and no charitable deduction can be claimed on the federal tax return. State income tax treatment varies by state.  If you or your spouse has earned income, you can still contribute to a traditional IRA. Tax Deductible IRA contributions made for the year you reach 70½ and later years can reduce your annual QCD allowance.

How it’s taxed

Generally, required minimum distributions are taxed as ordinary income, except for any money that has already been taxed as non-deductible contributions, or that can be received tax-free.


Penalties

Failing to withdraw or making withdrawals that are less than the required minimum distribution is subject to an IRS penalty of 50% of the amount that was not withdrawn.


Inherited accounts and RMDs

When you inherit a retirement account, you need to calculate the required minimum distribution for the account inherited. The options vary based on if you are the sole beneficiary of your spouse's account or someone else. In addition to the options below, an owner's surviving spouse and sole beneficiary has the option to transfer an IRA to the spouse's own IRA and treat it as his/her own. Options for taking required minimum distributions include:

Inherited assets prior to January 1, 2020

Traditional, SIMPLE, and SEP

If original owner dies before required beginning date

  • Spouse: Begin taking RMDs by the later of December 31 of the year in which the owner would have turned 70 ½, or the year following the owner’s death, based on your single life expectancy. If you use your life expectancy, use the Single Life Expectancy Table each year to determine the factor. Spouse has option to roll to own IRA.
  • Non-spouse: Begin taking the RMD for your inherited account by no later than December 31 of the year following the owner's death. Use the Single Life Expectancy Table to determine the factor to use for the first distribution. For each year after that, reduce that life expectancy factor by one.

OR

  • Take a full distribution by December 31 of the year containing the fifth anniversary of the owner’s death (five-year rule). Organizations and other non-person beneficiaries must use the five-year rule. Exceptions may apply for some trusts.

If original owner dies after required beginning date

  • If the owner did not take that year's RMD prior to death, the beneficiary(ies) must withdraw any remaining amount prior to the end of the year.
  • Spouse: Begin taking RMDs no later than December 31 of the year following the original owner’s death, based on the longer of your or what would have been your spouse’s single life expectancy.
  • If using your life expectancy, use the table each year to determine the factor. If using your spouse’s factor, it is reduced by one each year.
  • Non-spouse: Begin taking RMDs no later than December 31 of the year following the owner's death. Use the life expectancy factor of you or the owner (in the year of death) found in the Single Life Expectancy Table that results in the longer distribution period. Reduce the factor by one each subsequent year.

Roth IRA
  • Spouse: Roll into your own IRA or begin taking RMDs no later than December 31 of the year following the owner's death, based on your single life expectancy. Use the Single Life Expectancy Table to determine the factor to use based on your age. Spouse has option to roll to own IRA.
  • Non-spouse: Begin taking RMDs no later than December 31 of the year following the owner's death. Use the life expectancy factor of you or the owner (in the year of death) found in the Single Life Expectancy Table that results in the longer distribution period. Reduce the factor by one each subsequent year.

OR

  • Take a full distribution by December 31 of the year containing the fifth anniversary of the owner’s death (five-year rule). Organizations and other non-person beneficiaries must use the five-year rule. Exceptions may apply for some trusts.

 
Inherited assets after December 31, 2019

Traditional, SIMPLE, SEP IRA, and Roth IRA

Spouse: Begin taking RMDs no later than December 31 of the year in which the owner would have turned 72, or the year following the owner's death based on your single life expectancy. Use the Single Life Expectancy Table, each year, to determine the factor to use based on your age. Spouse has option to roll to own IRA.

Non-spouse: A full distribution of the account must be made by December 31 of the tenth year following the year of the owner’s death. There are no annual distributions required. This changes in 2023, annual distributions will be required if the owner dies post required beginning date. Pre required beginning date beneficiary can elect the 10 year rule without annual distributions.

  • If you are less than 10 years younger, disabled or chronically ill, you can begin distributions by December 31 of the year following the owner’s death based on your single life expectancy. Use the Single Life Expectancy Table to determine the factor to use based on your age. Reduce the factor by one each subsequent year.
  • If you are a minor child of the owner, you can begin distributions by December 31 of the year following the owner’s death based on your single life expectancy. Reduce the factor by one each subsequent year. Once you reach age of majority the balance of the assets must be distributed within 10 years.

Consult your tax advisor

Calculating Required Minimum Distributions can be tricky. At Thrivent Mutual Funds, we recommend you consult your tax advisor. Thrivent Mutual Funds and their representatives cannot provide legal or tax advice.


1 5%+ owners of business sponsoring retirement plan must start RMDs by April 1 following the calendar year in which they reach age 72 regardless if there is a delayed retirement provision. However, if you turned 70½ in 2019 or prior you must continue to take your RMDs as scheduled.

 

Looking for an IRS form or publication?

The IRS's online resources can help.

Visit IRS.gov