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A Roth IRA with Thrivent Mutual Funds is an individual retirement account to which you make contributions with money on which you’ve already paid taxes. With a Roth IRA you have the potential to take tax-free withdrawals of earnings in retirement. Learn about the features, rules, and limits of a Roth IRA.

Roth IRAs Are a Great Choice for People Who:

  • Have earned income
  • Expect to be in a higher tax bracket in retirement
  • Would benefit from federal tax-free distributions of earnings in the future
  • Don’t want to be subject to Required Minimum Distributions
  • Want the flexibility to withdraw contributions at any time 

The Thrivent Approach

Whether your goal is accumulation or distribution, a Roth IRA with Thrivent Mutual Funds offers simple solutions to diversify investments based on your risk tolerance. Choose from all-in-one investments or build your own allocations according to your specific objectives.

Roth IRA Highlights

Contribution Limits

  • 2016 and 2017: $5,500 total per year; $6,500 if you’re age 50 or older.
  • No age limit to open or contribute to a Roth IRA.
  • Contribution amounts may be reduced or you may be ineligible to make contributions depending on your earned income for the year. See IRS Contributions and Deduction Limits or IRS Publication 590 for further details.
  • Contributions aren’t tax deductible.

Thrivent Minimum Investment

  • $1,000 per Thrivent mutual fund without recurring contributions, or
  • $50 monthly recurring contribution for all Thrivent mutual funds except for the Thrivent Money Market Fund or Thrivent Limited Maturity Bond which are $100 per month.

Roth IRA Conversion

  • If you have assets in a traditional IRA or employer-sponsored retirement plan and decide that a Roth IRA is a better fit, you can convert some or all of those assets into a Roth IRA.
  • Federal and possibly state income tax will be due the year of the conversion.
  • A conversion is generally most advantageous if you expect your tax bracket to be higher in the future and if you can pay any taxes on the amount converted with assets from outside your IRA.

Distributions

  • No required minimum distributions during the owner's lifetime; however, beneficiaries must take required minimum distributions similar to Traditional IRAs.
  • Qualified distributions are free from federal income tax (see section on Qualified Distributions). In addition, contributions (principal) can be withdrawn tax- and penalty-free at any time.
  • The earnings portion of non-qualified distributions are subject to federal income tax and if taken before age 59 ½ may also be subject to the 10% early withdrawal penalty unless an exception applies.

Ordering Rules for Distributions

If you take a distribution from your Roth IRA that is not a qualified distribution, part of it may be taxable. There is a set order that contributions, conversions and earnings are considered to be distributed from your Roth IRA. If you have multiple Roth IRA’s, they are aggregated together for ordering purposes. The order is: 

  1. Contributions.
  2. Roth IRA conversions and rollover contributions from other types of retirement accounts on a first-in, first-out basis. The taxable portion of the conversion/rollover is first, followed by the nontaxable portion. 
  3. Earnings.

 

Qualified Distributions

  • Qualified distributions are not subject to federal income tax. State tax treatment varies. Check with your tax advisor for more information.
  • A distribution is qualified if it meets the following criteria:  
    • It has been at least 5 years from the beginning of the year the first Roth IRA contribution was made;  AND
    • You reach age 59 ½, you are buying your first home ($10,000 limit), you are disabled, or the distribution is made to the beneficiary of the IRA.

Early Withdrawal Penalty Exceptions

You may not have to pay the 10% additional penalty tax on the taxable portion of a non-qualified distribution in the following situations:

  • You are at least 59 ½.
  • You are totally and permanently disabled.
  • You are the beneficiary of a deceased IRA owner.
  • You are buying or building your first home ($10,000 life time limit).
  • You have unreimbursed medical expenses that are more than 10% of your adjusted gross income for the year. 
  • You are unemployed and paying medical insurance premiums. 
  • The distributions are used to cover qualified higher education expenses, but the distribution must not exceed the total qualified expenses. 
  • The distribution is due to an IRS levy of the qualified plan. 
  • The distribution is a qualified reservist distribution.

Thrivent Mutual Funds Fees

  • Annual IRA custodial fee is $15 per shareholder (traditional, SEP and Roth IRAs combined). Fee may be waived if you have $50,000 or more invested in Thrivent Mutual Funds or have a recurring purchase plan
  • Annual small account fee of $12 may apply for those accounts not maintaining minimum balance requirements.  See the Prospectus for more information.
  • IRA account closeout fee of $20.
  • Other fees may apply for certain services and are redeemed directly from your account. Examples include overnight delivery or wire fees. 

Additional Documents

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