Three ways to buy Thrivent funds

We’re here to help you invest with confidence.

MUTUAL FUNDS

Thrivent Account

You can purchase mutual funds right on our site with an online account.

Buy with a Thrivent account

  • Set up an account starting with as little as $50 per month.1
  • Access your online account at your convenience.
  • Purchase funds without transaction fees or sales charges.

MUTUAL FUNDS & ETFS

Financial Professional

For guidance when investing, ask a financial professional about buying Thrivent mutual funds & ETFs.

Buy with a financial professional

  • Receive investment help from an experienced professional.
  • Build a relationship through in-person meetings.
  • Get help planning for life’s goals such as saving and retirement.
  • Additional fees may apply.

MUTUAL FUNDS & ETFS

Brokerage Account

If you already have a brokerage account, our mutual funds & ETFs can be purchased through online brokerage platforms by searching for Thrivent Mutual Funds and ETFs.

Buy with a brokerage account

  • Add Thrivent Mutual Funds and ETFs to your investments within your existing portfolio.
  • Take advantage of your account to keep your investments in one place.
  • Additional fees may apply.
Not quite ready?

We want you to invest your money wisely and with confidence.
Here are some other options that may help you.

  • Take our quiz to determine your personal investment style.
  • Talk to your financial advisor about ETFs.
  • Sign up for our monthly investing insights newsletter.

 

Need more help?

If you need assistance, we’re here to help. Reach out to us via the phone, email, and support page information below.

 

This ETF is different from traditional ETFs. Traditional ETFs tell the public what assets they hold each day. This ETF will not. This may create additional risks for your investment. For example:

 - You may have to pay more money to trade the ETF’s shares. This ETF will provide less information to traders, who tend to charge more for trades when they have less information.

 - The price you pay to buy ETF shares on an exchange may not match the value of the ETF’s portfolio. The same is true when you sell shares. These price differences may be greater for this ETF compared to other ETFs because it provides less information to traders.

 - These additional risks may be even greater in bad or uncertain market conditions.

 - The ETF will publish on its website each day a “Proxy Portfolio” designed to help trading in shares of the ETF. While the Proxy Portfolio includes some of the ETF’s holdings, it is not the ETF’s actual portfolio.

The differences between this ETF and other ETFs may also have advantages. By keeping certain information about the ETF secret, this ETF may face less risk that other traders can predict or copy its investment strategy. This may improve the ETF’s performance. If other traders are able to copy or predict the ETF’s investment strategy, however, this may hurt the ETF’s performance. For additional information regarding the unique attributes and risks of the ETF, see the Principal Risks section of the prospectus.

1 New accounts with a minimum investment amount of $50 are offered through the Thrivent Mutual Funds "automatic purchase plan." Otherwise, the minimum initial investment requirement is $2,000 for non-retirement accounts and $1,000 for IRA or tax-deferred accounts, minimum subsequent investment requirement is $50 for all account types. Account minimums for other options vary.

Thrivent ETFs may be purchased through your financial professional or brokerage platforms.

Contact your financial professional or brokerage firm to understand minimum investment amounts when purchasing a Thrivent ETF.

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INVESTING ESSENTIALS

Long-term investing strategies to help increase gains

Mixed couple at home looking at their investments on a laptop at nighttime

Key points

Have a plan

Knowing your risk tolerance and investing goals is a first step in developing a long-term investing strategy.

Long-term investing contributions

Making regular contributions to your investments helps investors avoid the challenges of timing the market.


When it comes to determining your investing strategy for future years—or even decades—the planning process may feel overwhelming. Questions like “Where are the markets heading?” or “Is my mutual fund diversified enough?” are common. Learn how these long-term investment strategies may help you achieve your investing goals.

Know your plan

Before developing an investment strategy, it’s important to establish what financial goals you want to achieve. For example, do you need to save for a shorter-term expense like a wedding in a few years, or something that lasts several years, like retirement? Knowing when you need your investments can help you choose the appropriate strategy, especially when it comes to liquidity and risk. (See Investing for short-term goals.)


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Subscribe to receive tips to help navigate your financial journey and ideas for setting and reaching your goals.


Choose a diversified portfolio

Choosing a well-diversified portfolio that suits your individual risk tolerance based on your plan can help when investing long term. With a mutual fund, you purchase shares of a fund invested in multiple stocks, bonds and other securities, reducing the exposure investors may take on when owning individual stocks tied to only one company’s performance. Thrivent Asset Management offers actively managed mutual funds that are diversified for a variety of risk tolerances, which means you can select a fund that aligns with your investing style and goals. Take the investing style quiz to learn what types of funds may suit your needs.

Invest using dollar cost averaging

Dollar cost averaging1 is the term used to define investing at regular intervals with the same amount of money each time. It is an easy technique to set up with automated investments. Simply purchase the same dollar amount ($100 in the example below) in your mutual fund account every month or quarter. The cost of the shares may be higher one month and lower another month, but over time the intent is for you to benefit from an average purchase price. Purchasing at intervals reduces the risk of investing a large amount all at once when the cost of shares may be high.

Dollar-cost averaging illustration

Month Investment Cost per unit Total units purchased
Month Investment Cost per unit Total units purchased
May $100 $1.00 100
June $100 $0.95 105
July $100 $0.85 118
August $100 $1.05 95
4-month total $400 $0.96 418

Hypothetical example is for illustrative purposes only.

Stay invested through volatile markets

Historically, it has paid to stay invested through market ups and downs: the stock market has trended upward over the long haul, and it is notoriously difficult to predict when the market is going to shift. The financial crisis of 2008 saw the S&P 500® Index—a market-cap-weighted index that represents the average performance of a group of 500 large-capitalization stocks—plummet to a low of 676.53 on March 9, 2009. It then rebounded over 200% to 2043.92 by December 31, 2015. Staying invested through a drop in the market may allow you to reap the benefits of a subsequent rebound. A drop in the market only costs money if you sell and lose money on your investment. Following that with the potential of missing the best days to be in the market, trying to time the market can significantly impact long-term performance over time.

While you can’t invest directly in an index and this performance does not include the typical costs of investing, the following chart shows the growth of $10,000 from 2009 through the end of 2023 if you could have invested it in the S&P 500 Index. The lower half of the chart shows annualized returns if you had invested in the S&P 500 Index in 2009 and never sold, if you had missed the 10 best days, the 25 best days or the 50 best days:

Chart depicting the growth of $10,000 invested in the S&P 500 Index from 2009 through 2024.
Chart depicting the growth of $10,000 invested in the S&P 500 Index from 2009 through 2024.

Sources: Standard & Poor’s; Thrivent, Jan. 30, 2024; National Bureau of Economic Research

Chart depicting the growth of $10,000 invested in the S&P 500 Index from 2009 through 2023 that emphasizes the importance of being invested during the best days of the market.
Chart depicting the growth of $10,000 invested in the S&P 500 Index from 2009 through 2023 that emphasizes the importance of being invested during the best days of the market.

Sources: Standard & Poor’s; Thrivent, Jan. 30, 2024; National Bureau of Economic Research

Reinvest dividends and capital gains

Mutual funds may periodically pay dividends and capital gains. If you set up your account so these payments automatically reinvest, you’ll purchase additional mutual fund shares and build your holdings without having to add more cash to your account. Similar to dollar cost averaging, reinvesting dividends and capital gains can occur automatically at regular intervals.

Make investing changes as needed

That initial investing plan you developed may change over time. It could be because of a lifestyle change like marriage, birth of a child or death in the family, or an investing personality change like you want to adjust your risk tolerance. It’s a good practice to review your overall investing strategy yearly to make small balancing adjustments, but also to confirm that the strategy is meeting your current financial goals.

 


 

Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results.

1Dollar cost averaging does not ensure a profit, nor does it protect against losses in a declining market. Because dollar cost averaging involves continuous investing, investors should consider their long-term ability to continue to make purchases through periods of low price levels. While diversification can help reduce market risk, it does not eliminate it. Diversification does not assure a profit or protect against loss in a declining market.

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