Skip to main content

Looking to Learn More? Sign up for our Investing Insights newsletter. Subscribe

Thanks for Signing Up!

Be sure to check your inbox for the Investing Insights newsletter to get the latest news and insights from Thrivent Mutual Funds.

Well that's unexpected - your subscription request was not submitted. Please try again.

Great news - you're on the list!

Looks like you're already on our mailing list. Be sure to check your inbox for the Investing Insights newsletter to get the latest news and insights from Thrivent Mutual Funds.

Escheatment FAQs



To protect your Thrivent Mutual Funds account(s) from being deemed abandoned under unclaimed property laws and turned over to the state, it is necessary for you to affirmatively contact us regarding your account(s). 

  • Online: 
    • For those working with a Financial Representative, log into your account by going to Thrivent.com and clicking on "Log In," using your user ID and password. If you have not logged in before, click on the “Register Now” button. (Note: You will need your Thrivent Shareholder ID to register; click on the “Find ID” link in the Get Started section of the registration process if you need help). 
    • For those who purchased direct from thriventfunds.com, log in to your account.
  • Phone: To contact a Shareholder Service Professional, call 800-847-4836 and say ‘mutual funds’ when prompted.
  • Present the uncashed check to your bank: It’s important to present the uncashed check(s) to your bank for payment. Your account may be considered unclaimed if the check(s) remains uncashed. 

What is escheatment?

All states require financial institutions to report or turn over personal property that has been abandoned/unclaimed for a certain amount of time. That amount of time varies by state. 

The financial institution must make a concerted effort to locate the account owner. If they are not able to locate the account owner and the account stays inactive for the period of time outlined by the state, the financial institution must report the account to the state in which the account is held. The state then becomes the owner of the account through the "escheatment" process.

When is an account deemed abandoned?

Generally, an account is deemed abandoned or unclaimed if there has been no account activity or contact with the financial institution for the set period of time determined by the state. The unclaimed property could be in the form of an uncashed check issued in your name and/or mutual fund shares.

Another way an account can be deemed abandoned is when the address on the account has been deemed undeliverable by the United States Postal Service.

What is considered activity?

Generally, state abandoned property laws require property holders (i.e. Thrivent Mutual Funds) to ensure “affirmative contact” with property owners at regular intervals, typically every two years. Activity can be considered logging into your account, calling customer service or a financial representative, or writing us directly. 

How long does Thrivent Mutual Funds hold unclaimed property and what happens after that?

Thrivent Mutual Funds holds unclaimed property according to state laws. All states have established time periods during which there is a lack of affirmative contact called the “dormancy period.” After that point in time, Thrivent Mutual Funds may be required to report the property as unclaimed and send the property to the State Treasury Department, even if Thrivent Mutual Funds knows where the account owner lives. That is why an affirmative mailing is crucial to the shareholder.

Once the property goes to the state, can it ever be claimed again?

Thrivent Mutual Funds’ goal is to have regular affirmative contact with its shareholders in order to limit the instances when property must be turned over to a state. If property must be reported and paid to the state, each state has specific processes for claiming unclaimed property.  Check with your state’s Treasury Department for information on how to file a claim. There is generally no charge to claim your property, and you do not need to hire a third party to help you file a claim or locate property.

Some states allow heirs or original owners to claim their property indefinitely, while others will keep the property by means of escheatment if the property goes unclaimed for a certain amount of time.

Is being enrolled in an automatic investment or redemption program considered contact?

Generally, state regulations do not consider automatic investment or redemption plans to count as contact on your account. If this is your only investment activity, you will likely need to establish contact by another method. An ongoing transaction such as a systematic purchase or redemption made by direct deposit will continue, so it is considered ‘passive contact’. A company may not rely on ‘passive contact’ with a shareholder to fulfill unclaimed property law requirements. Some other examples of passive contact include the mailing of statements, correspondence, and tax forms (even if those communications are not returned by the post office as undeliverable).

What happens if the shares in my account are escheated?

If the shares in your account are escheated, your account will have a zero balance as of the date of escheatment. In order to re-claim your funds, you will have to contact the state to which the account was escheated and request that the shares be returned to you. After a period of time, states tend to sell the securities in escheated accounts and treat the proceeds as state funds.

What do states do with the money?

The state maintains the value of the account until it is claimed by the owner (or the owner’s beneficiaries). For mutual fund accounts, the account is liquidated and the state holds the proceeds of the liquidated account. When an owner finds the account and wants to reclaim it, they must verify their ownership of the property and prove their identity. After that, the value of the account (from the date at which it was liquidated) will be returned to the owner. Until that time, the states have full use of those funds to use as permitted by state law.

How can I learn more about the escheatment laws in my state?

Each state has a website that describes its unclaimed, or abandoned, property laws. Please visit the unclaimed property for your state for more information.

Where can I find if I have had any accounts turned over to a state?

Visit the National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators, where you can search nationwide or by individual state.

Search the state in which you currently reside, any state in which you have previously lived or the state in which your financial institution is incorporated or organized.